Del. HC: Entities Restrained from Infringing Personality Rights of Actor Jackie Shroff  ||  Bom HC: Authorisation to Export Necessary Even if Exporter has License to Sell Drugs for Med. Purpose  ||  Constitution Bench Judgment Not Considered, Supreme Court Recalls Judgement Passed in 2022  ||  SC: Full Ownership of Property Under S.14 (1) Can be Claimed by Hindu Woman Only if She Possesses it  ||  Supreme Court: Can’t Apply CrPC Retrospectively to Jammu & Kashmir Before 31.10.2019  ||  Mad. HC: Ritual of Devotee Rolling Over Leaves on Which Food Was Eaten by Others, Allowed  ||  Karnataka HC: Can’t Provide Free Bus Service to Enable Voters to Reach Polling Booth  ||  Gau. HC Declares Levy of Court Fee at the rate of 7% for Grant of Probate as Unconstitutional  ||  Cal. HC: Can’t Say Retracted Statement to be Involuntary Without Being Examined by Court  ||  Supreme Court: Union Directed to Deport 17 Foreigners in Assam’s Transit Camps    

RBI releases the Financial Stability Report, July 2021- (Reserve Bank of India) (01 Jul 2021)

MANU/RPRL/0092/2021

Banking

The Reserve Bank released the 23rd issue of the Financial Stability Report (FSR), which reflects the collective assessment of the Sub-Committee of the Financial Stability and Development Council (FSDC) on risks to financial stability and the resilience of the financial system in the context of contemporaneous issues relating to development and regulation of the financial sector.

Highlights:

Sustained policy support, benign financial conditions and the gathering momentum of vaccination are nurturing an uneven global recovery.

Policy support has helped in shoring up financial positions of banks, containing non-performing loans and maintaining solvency and liquidity globally.

On the domestic front, the ferocity of the second wave of COVID-19 has dented economic activity, but monetary, regulatory and fiscal policy measures have helped curtail the solvency risk of financial entities, stabilise markets, and maintain financial stability.

The capital to risk-weighted assets ratio (CRAR) of scheduled commercial banks (SCBs) increased to 16.03 per cent and the provisioning coverage ratio (PCR) stood at 68.86 per cent in March 2021.

Macro stress tests indicate that the gross non-performing asset (GNPA) ratio of SCBs may increase from 7.48 per cent in March 2021 to 9.80 per cent by March 2022 under the baseline scenario; and to 11.22 per cent under a severe stress scenario, although SCBs have sufficient capital, both at the aggregate and individual level, even under stress. Going forward, as banks respond to credit demand in a recovering economy, they will need to reinforce their capital and liquidity positions to fortify themselves against potential balance sheet stress.

Tags : FINANCIAL STABILITY   REPORT   RELEASE  

Share :        

Disclaimer | Copyright 2024 - All Rights Reserved